"Boeddeker Trekkers" Walking Group

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Detailed Description

Tenants of four supportive housing sites managed by Delivering Innovation for Supportive Housing (DISH) in the Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco participated in a weekly walking group called Boeddeker Trekkers. Tenants of four supportive housing sites managed by Delivering Innovation for Supportive Housing (DISH) in the Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco participated in a weekly walking group called Boeddeker Trekkers. Tenants were invited to participate in the program by word-of-mouth and signing up in their hotel. 22 individuals living in DISH-managed housing units participated in at least one walking group. 8 tenants attended all six sessions, and 13 participated in five or six walking group sessions. 14 participants completed both a pre- and post-questionnaire. Based on the enthusiasm for this pilot project, DISH has extended the program for additional tenants.

Expected Outcomes

Not all participants attended every session. Out of those who attended five or six out of the six sessions got to walk for 45 minutes each week, had a healthy lunch, and enjoyed the park. 79% (11) perceive the neighborhood as safe or very safe when walking in the Tenderloin during the day compared with 42% (6) before participating in Boeddeker Trekkers 42% (6) had a positive change in their perception of safety walking in the Tenderloin during the day 21% (3) had a negative change in their perception of safety walking in the Tenderloin during the day 50% (7) perceive the neighborhood as safe or very safe when walking in the Tenderloin during the night, compared with 29% (4) before participating in Boeddeker Trekkers 36% (5) had a positive change in their perception of safety walking in the Tenderloin during the night 21% (3) had a negative change in their perception of safety walking in the Tenderloin during the night 50% (7) responded that they will visit Boeddeker Park frequently, compared with 29% (4) who said they have gone to Boeddeker Park frequently since it opened in 2014 when asked before participating in Boeddeker Trekkers 57% (8) showed an increase in the frequency that they plant to visit Boeddeker Park after Boeddeker Trekkers, when compared to the frequency with which they had visited the park since it opened in 2014 Out of the 11 participants which identified personal goals met by Boeddeker Trekkers: 82% (9) - Got outside and/or to Boeddeker more 82% (9) - Met new people 73% (8) - Increased fitness level 73% (8) - Learned more about health 64% (7) - Became more involved in building's activities

Evidence

Emerging bright spot (emerging evidence)

Key Principles

n/a

Failing Forward Moments

n/a

Key Lessons Learned

Some changes DISH staff would make for next time: A simpler version of the incentive program. Keeping track of attendance and incentive distribution for each person was time-consuming. Meeting more than once a week to walk. Several tenants would diligently come to every available opportunity. Tenant leaders at each site. Tenants who are most excited about the program will be able to keep up morale and encourage other tenants to participate. Increased participation from DISH staffers, leading arm exercises while walking or changing direction to break up the monotony of 45 minutes of walking.

Tags

Nature, Nutrition, Physical activity, Community, Walking

Cost Details

Cost of incentives and lunches totaled: $3,375

Key Steps for Implementation

  • Identify walking route that will interest participants
  • Find incentives designed to encourage participation and to incentivize participants to meet their personal goals
  • Identify walking group dates/times; try and be consistent and aware of potential weather conditions
  • Promote program in residences and ask for signups to register; remind participants in advance of sessions
  • Each session: walk to park, walk for 45 minutes, enjoy healthy lunch, and learn about health; debrief after each session

Partnerships

None required. Coordinated with park staff.

Required Staffing (FTEs)

.1 FTE for about 8 weeks (6 weeks of program plus planning and analysis of data)

Special Funding

A small grant was used to pay for incentives.

Special Infrastructure

Park with walking path or other route.

Incentives were purchased with grant funds:

  • Pedometer
  • Water bottle
  • Trekkers jacket
  • Walking socks
  • Walking shoes
  • Target gift card

Training

None for core program. Department of Public Health staff provided educational sessions on benefit of fitness, exercise, and healthy eating.

Types of Staff

For this program staff volunteered to participate. Health educators came for lunch talks.

Return on Investment Details

There was no cost-benefit analysis conducted. Funding partner found the "lessons learned" to be worth the grant.

Outcome Measures

  • Perception of Safety (walking in the Tenderloin for day and night)
  • How often do you visit/will you visit Boeddeker Park
  • What are your goals for this program/What goals did you meet from this program?
  • Go outside and/or to Boeddeker more
  • Meet new people|Increase fitness level
  • Learn more about health
  • Become more involved in building's activities

Process Measures

  • Attendance at each walking session.
  • Qualitative input after each session from participants.

Key Contacts

Lauren Hall, Director, Delivering Innovation in Supportive Housing (DISH)

Will Douglas, Manager, Community Impact, Tenderloin Health Improvement Partnership, Saint Francis Foundation

Snapshot

Topic
  • Diet and exercise

Sector
  • Public health

  • Sports and recreation

Time

Fewer than 12 months

This is a description.

Difficulty

Easy/not that challenging

Cost

Minimal

Evidence

Emerging bright spot (emerging evidence)

Setting
  • Neighborhood

  • Broader community

ROI

To be determined

Age
  • All ages

Geographic Context
  • Not applicable

Geographic Unit
  • City/Town

Words to Describe